Character Education

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  • "Which of the following is a way to show respect for your elders?" 18 multiple choice questions.
  • "John doesn't want to work with Mark." A fictional reading comprehension designed to help teach students character education. Reflective short answer questions can be used for discussion or writing practice.

  • "She looked at the spelling test quickly and then hid it in her desk." A fictional reading comprehension designed to help teach students character education. Reflective short answer questions can be used for discussion or writing practice.

  • [member-created document] This sample was made with the abcteach word search puzzle tool. From "caring" to "trustworthy".
  • "Alejandro wanted a dog." A fictional reading comprehension designed to help teach students character education. Reflective short answer questions can be used for discussion or writing practice.

  • This short lesson doesn't provide answers, but provides the vocabulary for discussing ethical questions.
  • [member-created document] This sample was made with the abcteach word search puzzle tool.
  • Read Kipling's poem on adulthood, and fill in the missing verbs. Then match the lines to their modern-day equivalents. Finally, discussion (or essay) questions to address the themes of the poem: adulthood, coming of age, etc. This lesson is adaptable to a variety of levels.
  • This unit uses the story of the miller, his son, and their donkey as a foundation for talking about fitting in. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts (and a word search!), as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels. Common Core: RL.3.2

  • The review questions with this reading comprehension (one page each of "Bloom's Taxonomy") are helpful for critical thinking development.

  • Jason and Malcolm both wake up wanting a bike ride, but the boys have very different ways of doing what they want. Compare the two stories using charts; answer short questions; make predictions about the future. A good character education lesson. Common Core: ELA: Reading Literature: RL.5.3

  • Meredith and Alexis both play sports, but their styles and attitudes couldn't be more different. Compare the two girls and the adults in their lives using charts and outlines. A good character education lesson. Common Core: ELA: Reading Literature: RL.5.3

  • This is a great way of involving parents and students in goal-setting. Starting with a letter to parents and ending with a form for helping students achieve self-set goals, measure their own progress, and learn the sense of accomplishment that comes with achievement!
  • Nancy and Angela both want a snack; both girls decide to bake cookies. But there the stories diverge. Compare the two stories using charts; answer short questions; make predictions about the future. A good character education lesson. Common Core: ELA: Reading Literature: RL.5.3