Thinking Skills

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  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "When Kevin told his father he shouldn't watch so much TV, his father asked him where he wanted to go on vacation next summer."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "More and more people are buying sports cars. It's time for you to buy one too!"
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "A website I read said milk makes you taller. I know it's true because the website said it was."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Marge opposed the governor's plan to fight poverty because it didn't eliminate all poverty."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "You still read those books? What are you, a baby? Only babies like those books."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "People under the age of 18 should not have the right to vote because only adults should have the right to vote."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Everyone has a right to their opinion, even a liar like Ed."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Either you're born smart, or you eventually flunk out of school."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Cats have kittens. So don't get a cat if you don't want to be a crazy cat lady with a house full of cats."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "The sun comes up when my rooster crows. My rooster makes the sun rise."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples."Gina was so afraid. Her neighbor had a mean dog. Gina was sure it would bite her some day."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Diane broke her leg the first time she tried skiing. 'Skiing is dangerous: you always break your leg,' she said."
  • A one page reading comp on the life of President Cleveland, with reading comp and short answer questions and one essay question.
  • Categorical syllogisms, illicit majors, equivocation, amphiboly, and more... it sounds tricky, but this unit clears away the confusion.
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Mick likes spiders, so he'll be pleased to find some in his shirt."
  • Poster describes the fallacy and gives examples. "Of course we should drive big cars. We've always driven big cars."
  • This thorough unit is packed with information about some of the most common fallacies: how to spot them, and how to avoid them.
  • Poster describes the fallacy and gives examples. "Vegetarians want us to live from leaves and grass, and that is ridiculous."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples."Please give me the job, because my children are sick and I have a broken leg."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Errol claimed cats could read minds, because scientists had never proven they couldn't."
  • A one page reading comp of President James Madison, with comprehension and short answer questions and one essay question.
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Jack said Susan didn't cheat, but he is a thief, so she probably did cheat."
  • A one page reading comp of President Andrew Jackson, with comprehension and short answer questions and one essay question.
  • This super-sized reading and writing unit introduces the basic categories of literary conflict (man vs. nature, etc.) and presents two summarized stories for students to analyze in terms of internal/external conflict. The unit incorporates vocabulary, critical thinking, and research.
  • Five logical errors are presented and explained, then reviewed with comprehension questions and writing prompts.
  • This unit uses three of Aesop's shorter fables as a foundation for talking about unity. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts, as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels.
  • Defining the basics of survival needs, and taking creative approaches to survival situations.
  • From if/then statements to circle sets to syllogisms, this unit is sure to clarify the fundamentals of logical thinking. Includes solid practice questions for each section and an answer sheet.
  • "Carl, Joe, and Greg buy lunch. A hamburger costs $3, a hot dog costs $2, and a salad costs $2.50. Read the details and decide: Who ate what?" Use math and reasoning to solve the problems on these four pages.
  • This assignment sheet (with clear grading policies) transforms any social studies project into a challenging and fun presentation, as students choose the project that best reflects their abilities (as defined by Gardner's Multiple Intelligences).
  • Introduces the concept behind Benjamin Bloom's question categories, and helps students understand the different levels as they apply to their lives. This is a great fall/back to school unit! (12 pages)
  • "Reggie baby-sits for three families. Each family has a different number of children. Read the details and decide: How many children does each family have?" Use math and reasoning to solve 12 problems.
  • This thorough unit is packed with information about some of the most common fallacies: how to spot them, and how to avoid them. Subsequent lessons are available on our member site.
  • This unit uses the story of the miller, his son, and their donkey as a foundation for talking about fitting in. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts, as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels.
  • This short lesson doesn't provide answers, but provides the vocabulary for discussing ethical questions.
  • Logic puzzles help improve cognitive skills and deductive reasoning. Challenging (but not impossible!) brain exercises. Includes an answer sheet.
  • Read each situation. Identify one action (cause) and the consequence (effect). There may be more than one correct answer.
  • Read Kipling's poem on adulthood, and fill in the missing verbs. Then match the lines to their modern-day equivalents. Finally, discussion (or essay) questions to address the themes of the poem: adulthood, coming of age, etc. This lesson is adaptable to a variety of levels.
  • Logic puzzles help improve cognitive skills and deductive reasoning. Challenging (but not impossible!) brain exercises. Includes an answer sheet.
  • Jennifer has received an invitation to a party, but she doesn't know where or when it is, or who is giving it. Use logic and deductive reasoning to discover the secret of the invitation in this mini-unit. Challenging (but not impossible!), this 4 page puzzle includes an explanatory answer sheet.

Notes

  • PLEASE check other areas of the site for more MIDDLE SCHOOL materials. Many materials are multi-aged. Check out the theme units and teaching extras, book units, etc.