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Fictional Reading Comprehension Worksheets for Middle and High School

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  • A fictional reading comprehension about a boy's vacation with his father, who loves the cowboy life rather more than his son does.
  • Our fictional tale of a girl with a gulping habit is available at four different levels, with increasingly advanced vocabulary and activities. The middle school level includes reading comprehension and inference questions and exercises in understanding appropriate for middle school readers.
  • "I waited and studied the trees, peeling rings of chalky bark." This realistic fiction reading comprehension includes helpful suggestions to help students write their own descriptive essays.
  • Marie's trip to Washington, D.C. has her thinking about her favorite orator. A nice tie-in for MLK Day (third Monday in January), this reading comprehension is followed by multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions.
  • "Even when they’re vanquishing bad guys, secret agents always have impeccable manners." A fictional story about secret agent training (with real table manners), followed by multiple choice, short answer and essay questions.
  • “There was a blinding white flash and Martin Gonzales was knocked to the ground.” A boy travels back in time to learn about Aztec life in this vocabulary-packed story, reviewed by math, vocabulary, short answer, and writing worksheets.
  • Amy and Arnie bring their summer science project on the family vacation. Dad threatens to exterminate their 500 cockroaches if one gets loose in the family RV. Vocabulary list.
  • A hard crossword puzzle and bridge shaped word search based on words found in the short fiction text, "Do You See the Brooklyn Bridge?"
  • Gwen is disappointed in her summer visit to Granny's. Granny challenges Gwen to use her "tools" and teaches her some lessons about boredom and luck. Includes multiple choice and short answer questions. Writing prompt challenges students to write their own ending to the story using objects and ideas in the plot.
  • Charlie loves Easter! You'll see why- with this reading comprehension, word search, crossword puzzle, and writing activity.
  • "When the two main characters initially meet, what is the source of conflict?" This page of questions can be applied to almost any romance book (from Jane Austen to Meg Cabot). An excellent checklist for book reports, these questions are also a good way to check student comprehension.
  • "In what ways does the setting of the movie differ from how it was presented in the book?" Many popular children's books are being made into films-- this list of questions helps students develop critical thinking skills while comparing the two media.
  • A short story about a difficult summer job. The focus of this lesson is embedded SAT-level vocabulary (all nouns). The story is followed by questions to check vocabulary-based comprehension, context practice, synonym matching, and a guide word exercise.
  • "Raoul Kirschbaum climbed from the smoking wreckage of the time machine." A fictional story about meeting a real president with real dental problems, followed by multiple choice, short answer and essay questions.
  • Read this fictional account of Leonardo da Vinci, and then use inference skills to answer the questions on the next page. da Vinci's birthday is April 15th.
  • Read this fictional story about a mysterious sound, and then use inference skills to answer the questions on the next page.
  • Hannah and Nick dread the annual summer road trip, but this year their parents have a surprise for them. Multiple choice, short answer, essay question, vocabulary word list (abcteach.com list 4 level 2).
  • William's father has different ideas than William about how he should spend his life. His father's work protecting the endangered Mountain Gorilla as a Park Ranger in the Democratic Republic of the Congo seemed ideal to William. However, Dad says, "There are many ways to be a hero."
  • Jacob and his twin sister learn about the importance of family health history. Includes a set of short response and a set of multiple choice questions, plus a writing prompt that will help student make a plan for heart health in their family.
  • The Princess Easter needs eggs for the Easter party, but someone has stolen the chickens. What will she do? A modern "fairy tale" (and reading comprehension).
  • All Roger wants for his birthday is a computer. Will he get one? or...has his family forgotten his birthday?? A realistic fiction reading comprehension, with short answer questions.
  • A historical fiction story about a village that once had "gypsy" visitors forms the backdrop for this great mini-unit, featuring vocabulary building, comprehension questions, reflection, writing assignments, and more.
  • Fictional short story about a student science engineering project carried out at a zoo exhibit. Help students value planning and consider potential outcomes and consequences. Middle/High school level.
  • Tyler and Hannah are overwhelmed by the number of search results they get for the word Internet, when trying to research for an assignment. Mother helps them start the paper by explaining some of the changes the Internet has brought.
  • A 10 page set of differentiated activities related to the Clement's book, Frindle. Includes a list of 8 choices of activities with rubric score form and rubrics tally sheet, plus word searches and word unscrambles with answer keys.
  • A poetry reading comprehension about a broken window.
  • The tale of a boy who trades a panda for a pepper (??) is available at four different levels, with increasingly advanced vocabulary and activities. The middle school level includes reading comprehension, inference questions, metaphor and simile work, and exercises in understanding appropriate for middle school readers.
  • A folktale from Vietnam, with vocabulary, short answer comprehension questions, and a writing prompt.
  • This unit uses the story of the miller, his son, and their donkey as a foundation for talking about fitting in. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts, as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels.
  • Pam hopes to compost her way to a new mountain bike. When Gran ends up in the hospital, Pam wonders if she will be able to create good quality compost with out her grandmother's experience and help. Includes multiple choice and short answer comprehension questions and a long essay prompt.
  • A realistic fiction reading comprehension about a boy and his great love - baseball.
  • Read the "island adventure" advertisement and answer the comprehension questions; then create your own "island adventure".
  • This unit uses three of Aesop's shorter fables as a foundation for talking about unity. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts, as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels.
  • A realistic fiction story, and great testing practice! This reading comprehension would make a good opening for talking about friends, peer pressure, fitting in...
  • "What tasks must the hero accomplish?" This page of questions can be applied to almost any fantasy/adventure book. An excellent checklist for book reports, these questions are also a good way to check student comprehension.
  • Read a Pecos Bill tall tale and answer the multiple choice questions, then read a true story about Pecos Bill with short answer comprehension questions. Sort fact from fiction in a review worksheet. Think and write about the values reflected in these tall tales. Finally: Write your own Pecos Bill tall tale. A great unit!
  • Students read a story about a typical day in one man's life, then isolate the over 20 uses of electricity, concluding by rewriting the story without electricity.
  • "Patrick thought the only good thing about Daylight Saving Time was that people got to sleep an hour longer the night it ended." This short fiction is followed by multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions.

  • Read an Annie Oakley tall tale (based on "Annie Got Her Gun!") and answer the multiple choice questions, then read a true story about Oakley with short answer comprehension questions. Sort fact from fiction in a review worksheet. Think and write about the values reflected in these tall tales. Finally: Write your own Annie Oakley tall tale. A great unit and a fun "women's history month" tie-in.