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Social Studies Character Education Worksheets

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  • Rosa and Thomas both have ideas about peer pressure and bravery, but they have different ways of responding. Compare the two stories using charts; answer short questions; make predictions about the future. A good character education lesson. Common Core: ELA: Reading Literature: RL.5.3

  • Use this 'Writing Prompt: Building Community - My Family' printable worksheet in the classroom or at home. Your students will love this 'Writing Prompt: Building Community - My Family'. This two page template allows students to share their family with their class. Includes places to write, draw or post photos about their family. They will also include their position in their family as a single, oldest, middle or youngest child. Templates can be mounted to file folders or poster boards as well as bulletin boards for display.
  • Use this 'Writing Prompt: Building Community - Character Traits in the Classroom' printable worksheet in the classroom or at home. Your students will love this 'Writing Prompt: Building Community - Character Traits in the Classroom'. Students work with a partner to identify 4 character traits; then determine what they look and sound like in the classroom. In addition, acting out these traist is a fun classroom sharing activity to build community.
  • Booklet for reviewing some manners basics: answering a phone, being a guest or a host, and more.
  • This short lesson doesn't provide answers, but provides the vocabulary for discussing ethical questions.
  • Part of the abcteach character-education series, which introduces children to challenging life skills decisions and asks them, "What would you do if this happened to you?" This one addresses breaking rules to help someone who might be in trouble.
  • Part of the abcteach character-education series, which introduces children to challenging life skills decisions and asks them, "What would you do if this happened to you?" This one addresses admitting to a mistake.
  • This unit uses three of Aesop's shorter fables as a foundation for talking about unity. With imaginative writing and drawing prompts, as well as comprehension questions, this is a fun introduction to Aesop AND a solid lesson on character education and critical thinking skills. Available at four levels.
  • "After dinner, they have Michael do his homework and ask him if he has questions about it. Then at night, they tell him when to go to bed." A fictional reading comprehension designed to help teach students character education. Reflective short answer questions can be used for discussion or writing practice.

  • Nancy and Angela both want a snack; both girls decide to bake cookies. But there the stories diverge. Compare the two stories using charts; answer short questions; make predictions about the future. A good character education lesson. Common Core: ELA: Reading Literature: RL.5.3