You are an abcteach Member, but you are logged in to the Free Site. To access all member features, log into the Member Site.

SEARCH RESULTS: fallacy

Clip Art:
Advanced:
= Member Site Document
There are 24 documents matching your search.
  • Use this 'How to Argue... Using Fallacies (part 1) -upper elementary/middle' printable worksheet in the classroom or at home. Your students will love this 'How to Argue... Using Fallacies (part 1) -upper elementary/middle'. This thorough unit is packed with information about some of the most common fallacies: how to spot them, and how to avoid them. Subsequent lessons are available on our member site.
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Errol claimed cats could read minds, because scientists had never proven they couldn't."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Jack said Susan didn't cheat, but he is a thief, so she probably did cheat."
  • This thorough unit is packed with information about some of the most common fallacies: how to spot them, and how to avoid them.
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples."Please give me the job, because my children are sick and I have a broken leg."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples."Gina was so afraid. Her neighbor had a mean dog. Gina was sure it would bite her some day."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "You still read those books? What are you, a baby? Only babies like those books."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "More and more people are buying sports cars. It's time for you to buy one too!"
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "A website I read said milk makes you taller. I know it's true because the website said it was."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "People under the age of 18 should not have the right to vote because only adults should have the right to vote."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "The sun comes up when my rooster crows. My rooster makes the sun rise."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Either you're born smart, or you eventually flunk out of school."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Marge opposed the governor's plan to fight poverty because it didn't eliminate all poverty."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Mick likes spiders, so he'll be pleased to find some in his shirt."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Everyone has a right to their opinion, even a liar like Ed."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "When Kevin told his father he shouldn't watch so much TV, his father asked him where he wanted to go on vacation next summer."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Cats have kittens. So don't get a cat if you don't want to be a crazy cat lady with a house full of cats."
  • Poster defines the fallacy and gives examples. "Diane broke her leg the first time she tried skiing. 'Skiing is dangerous: you always break your leg,' she said."
  • Poster describes the fallacy and gives examples. "Vegetarians want us to live from leaves and grass, and that is ridiculous."
  • Poster describes the fallacy and gives examples. "Of course we should drive big cars. We've always driven big cars."
  • "I put on my pajamas and fell asleep. Pajamas make me fall asleep" is an example of what fallacy? Multiple choice.
  • "Of course we should drive big cars. We've always driven big cars," is an example of what fallacy? Multiple choice. These worksheets match the text of our posters.
  • Five logical errors are presented and explained, then reviewed with comprehension questions and writing prompts.
  • Categorical syllogisms, illicit majors, equivocation, amphiboly, and more... it sounds tricky, but this unit clears away the confusion.